The Collaboratory

In order to grow the Dayton region’s economic and social capital, the Collaboratory is providing the Collaborative Infrastructure—the physical space, portfolio of initiatives, engagement tools and support system for people from across the region to come together to imagine and act upon new possibilities for themselves, each other and the community, with a particular interest in downtown. These new possibilities will involve citizen, government, business, institutional, organizational and philanthropic participants and will impact how we live, work, play and learn.

The Collaboratory is an initiative of Involvement Advocacy.

Website: facebook.com/daytoncollaboratory/

Dayton Art Institute

Founded in 1919, The Dayton Art Institute is one of the region’s premier fine arts museums. In addition to exhibiting outstanding special exhibitions and impressive collections of art from throughout the world, the museum is renowned for education programming that includes an array of offerings for diverse audiences.

The Dayton Art Institute sits atop a hill on the edge of the Great Miami River overlooking downtown Dayton. The museum’s founding patrons included prominent community leaders such as Orville Wright and the Pattersons of NCR. The museum’s landmark building, designed by prominent museum architect Edward B. Green of Buffalo and completed in 1930, was modeled after the Villa d’Este near Rome and the Villa Farnese at Caprarola in Italy, both examples of sixteenth century Italian Renaissance architecture. Today, The Dayton Art Institute’s architecturally and historically significant facility is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Website: DaytonArtInstitute.org

21st Century Peace Literacy Foundation

WELCOME TO THE HUB PEACEBUILDER TOUR! The Rotarian Action Group for Peace (RAGFP) invites you to meet-up with The Hub online or in person to share your thoughts about peacebuilding. Through video interviews, we will be exploring two essential questions: “What does peacebuilding look like for you?” and “Why does peacebuilding matter?”The Hub Peacebuilder is a mobile “space for peace” that has been ‘Rotarized’ with “The Four Way Test” and a colorful “Peace Map” featuring Rotary’s worldwide peacebuilding network. It will serve as a venue for video interviews, inspiring live music and engaging conversations around peacebuilding.The crew is available to appear at local club meetings, community gatherings or an evening “RAG FOR PEACE” Happy Hour. The goal of the tour is to expand the RAGFP network along the West Coast. You can schedule a stop at 21cplf.org/schedule-a-stop.

Website: 21cplf.org

Five Rivers Chautauqua

The Five Rivers Chautauqua was inspired by the Peace Dayton Collaborative Group and has become an organization dedicated to dialogue and events each summer and fall. The group has been integral in planting Peace Trees, the pine tree ceremonies that are a Native American tradition.

During the Keeping the Tradition Pow Wow, the serene setting at SunWatch transformed with the beat of drums and the sounds and rhythm of American Indian music. For American Indians, Pow Wow is a special time to reflect upon a rich heritage and come into the Pow Wow circle with honor and respect for one another and the drum.

This Pow Wow is the culminating event of this year’s inaugural Five Rivers Chautauqua with storysharing and storylistening as we gather in right relationship to celebrate our unity.

Website: facebook.com/fiveriverschautauqua/

SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park

SunWatch, originally named the Incinerator Site, was first excavated and reported on in the 1960s by amateur archaeologists John Allman and Charles Smith. When news came in the early 1970s that the City of Dayton planned to expand a nearby sewage treatment plant onto the property and impact the site, Allman and Smith contacted James Heilman, the Curator of Anthropology at the Dayton Museum of Natural History, in hopes of recovering as much valuable information from the site as possible. In 1971 the Dayton Museum of Natural History (now the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery) began “salvage” excavations at the site with just this goal in mind.

Website: SunWatch.org/

Interfaith Forum of Greater Dayton

Each year the Interfaith Forum of Dayton takes on the large issues of race, gender, and poverty. Here is an example of their One Human Family workshops:

One Human Family Workshop (OHF) weekend which will take place in Dayton, OH – March 27 – 29, 2015 at
Christ Episcopal Church, 20 W. First St ., in downtown Dayton. The theme is “Unity in Diversity.”

Friday, March 27 (6:00 – 8:30pm) “Voices of Immigrant Experiences” These “Voices” gatherings are to serve as a bridge between the people of other cultures now residing here and the “local folk” and are meant to foster greater appreciation for each other. This one is different in that we will be focusing on the musical traditions (cultural and/or spiritual). Participants will break bread together with an International Dinner. H osted by the Dayton Human Relations Council Welcome Dayton initiative, the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ), and the Cultural Diversity Caucus which came out of the UD Community Summits on Eliminating Racism and is now part of NCCJ’s community initiatives.

Saturday, March 28 (9:00–4:30pm) One Human Family Workshop /Choir* the lyrics, songs of praise, protest, and purpose developed out of the African-American experiences from the days of the “sorrow songs”. will open the door for frank and honest dialogue to take place. We encourage everyone (teens and up), singers and non-singers alike to participate. We invite all attendees to participate in the concert on Sunday.

Sunday morning, March 29, some workshop choir participants will attend local venues to sing a song as a way to introduce the afternoon concert/dialogue program.

Sunday, March 29 (3:00-5:00) Concert/Dialogue hosted and sponsored by the Interfaith Forum of Dayton. The format is to use music/song lyrics instead of a speaker to foster meaningful dialogue to take place over refreshments midway through the program.

*If your worship service prevents you from participating in the Saturday workshop but you would like to be in the choir on Sunday please contact Colette at 937- 274-7009 or UnityinDiversity_2015_Dayton@yahoo.com to make other arrangements.

Wesbite: facebook.com/Interfaith-Forum-of-Greater-Dayton-143552765671563/

Dayton Metro Library

Dayton Metro Library is a multi-branch library system serving 476,000 residents of the Dayton Metropolitan Area. It has 21 locations across the area. Over 7.6 million items were checked out in 2008. (Wikipedia)
Since the founding of the Library in 1888, we’ve consistently met the changing needs of our diverse and growing community. Our materials, programs, and initiatives cover countless topics for all ages. We are unwavering in our focus on excellence, and we are passionate about providing consistent, quality service in our six outcomes. Explore the Annual Report to see our impact.

Dayton Literary Peace Prize

The leaders of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize are part of the Dayton Speakers Bureau.

The Dayton Literary Peace Prize, inaugurated in 2006, is the first and only annual U.S. literary award recognizing the power of the written word to promote peace. The Dayton Literary Peace Prize invites nominations in adult fiction and nonfiction books published within the past year that have led readers to a better understanding of other cultures, peoples, religions, and political points of view. Both awards carry a $10,000 cash prize.

Website: DaytonLiteraryPeacePrize.org

Dayton International Peace Museum

Founded in 2004, the Dayton International Peace Museum raises awareness of nonviolent strategies for achieving peace now and in the future. The Dayton International Peace Museum was founded by J. Frederick Arment, Ralph and Christine Dull, Steve Fryburg and Lisa Wolters.  It honors the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended war in Bosnia. Its mission is to inspire a local, national, and international culture of peace.

People cannot be expected to end disputes peacefully if they have never learned nonviolent alternatives. Yet, few places exist for the sole purpose of teaching people—especially children—nonviolent approaches to conflict resolution. A peace museum fills this void.

Located in downtown Dayton, the Museum is housed in the Isaac Pollack House, a three-story structure built in 1876 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Incorporated in Ohio in 2004, the Museum is a 501(3)C organization and relies on volunteers and private donors for its support. The Museum is a member of the International Network of Museums for Peace, which has members in 27 countries, including Germany, Iran, Japan, Kenya, and South Africa.

Website: DaytonPeaceMuseum.org