New Hope Evangelical Lutheran Church

This is an Evangelical Lutheran Church with a racially mixed congregation. Small in size but big in love.

In 2017, The congregation plans to host a Peace Festival on its lawn on Saturday, September 16, 2017 from 11:00am to 3:00pm. Activities will include concerns for reducing gun violence.
The police department, the sheriff’s department, and state troopers are being invited to participate. Various congregations from the community will begin each hour with prayer and song. (Let there be Peace on Earth). Persons, agencies and churches will be invited to come and share their peace activities.

2000 Catalpa Dr., Dayton, Ohio 45406

On Earth Peace

On Earth Peace is dedicated to building peace throughout all communities, through programs and trainings. In the Miami Valley, On Earth Peace focuses on racial justice organizing, which is meant to bring together local racial justice organizations and various congregations to bring about awareness and facilitate support and peace.

Website: OnEarthPeace.orgfacebook.com/onearthpeace/

Dayton Job Corps

At Dayton Job Corps, students receive the skills needed to succeed in today’s workforce – at no cost to them or their families!

If you are looking for a better quality of life and are willing to dedicate yourself to our life changing program, Dayton Job Corps is the place for you!

Young people interested in joining Job Corps are invited to visit the Job Corps Recruiting Website or call (800) 733-JOBS today!

Website: dayton.jobcorps.gov

Welcome Dayton

Welcome Dayton is a community initiative that reflects our country’s core philosophy: people with diverse backgrounds, skills and experiences fuel our nation’s success.  The Welcome Dayton effort promotes immigrant integration into the greater Dayton region by encouraging business and economic development; providing access to education, government, health and social services; ensuring equity in the justice system; and promoting an appreciation of arts and culture.

Website: WelcomeDayton.org

The Collaboratory

In order to grow the Dayton region’s economic and social capital, the Collaboratory is providing the Collaborative Infrastructure—the physical space, portfolio of initiatives, engagement tools and support system for people from across the region to come together to imagine and act upon new possibilities for themselves, each other and the community, with a particular interest in downtown. These new possibilities will involve citizen, government, business, institutional, organizational and philanthropic participants and will impact how we live, work, play and learn.

The Collaboratory is an initiative of Involvement Advocacy.

Website: facebook.com/daytoncollaboratory/

Dayton Art Institute

Founded in 1919, The Dayton Art Institute is one of the region’s premier fine arts museums. In addition to exhibiting outstanding special exhibitions and impressive collections of art from throughout the world, the museum is renowned for education programming that includes an array of offerings for diverse audiences.

The Dayton Art Institute sits atop a hill on the edge of the Great Miami River overlooking downtown Dayton. The museum’s founding patrons included prominent community leaders such as Orville Wright and the Pattersons of NCR. The museum’s landmark building, designed by prominent museum architect Edward B. Green of Buffalo and completed in 1930, was modeled after the Villa d’Este near Rome and the Villa Farnese at Caprarola in Italy, both examples of sixteenth century Italian Renaissance architecture. Today, The Dayton Art Institute’s architecturally and historically significant facility is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Website: DaytonArtInstitute.org

21st Century Peace Literacy Foundation

WELCOME TO THE HUB PEACEBUILDER TOUR! The Rotarian Action Group for Peace (RAGFP) invites you to meet-up with The Hub online or in person to share your thoughts about peacebuilding. Through video interviews, we will be exploring two essential questions: “What does peacebuilding look like for you?” and “Why does peacebuilding matter?”The Hub Peacebuilder is a mobile “space for peace” that has been ‘Rotarized’ with “The Four Way Test” and a colorful “Peace Map” featuring Rotary’s worldwide peacebuilding network. It will serve as a venue for video interviews, inspiring live music and engaging conversations around peacebuilding.The crew is available to appear at local club meetings, community gatherings or an evening “RAG FOR PEACE” Happy Hour. The goal of the tour is to expand the RAGFP network along the West Coast. You can schedule a stop at 21cplf.org/schedule-a-stop.

Website: 21cplf.org

Dayton Rotary

The Rotary Club of Dayton is a fellowship of diverse business and professional leaders who commit their time and talent to staying informed and serving the club, the community and the world.

The Rotary club of Dayton was organized May 27, 1912 and was chartered as the 47th club of Rotary International on June 2, 1913.

Website: portal.clubrunner.ca/4098

Five Rivers Chautauqua

The Five Rivers Chautauqua was inspired by the Peace Dayton Collaborative Group and has become an organization dedicated to dialogue and events each summer and fall. The group has been integral in planting Peace Trees, the pine tree ceremonies that are a Native American tradition.

During the Keeping the Tradition Pow Wow, the serene setting at SunWatch transformed with the beat of drums and the sounds and rhythm of American Indian music. For American Indians, Pow Wow is a special time to reflect upon a rich heritage and come into the Pow Wow circle with honor and respect for one another and the drum.

This Pow Wow is the culminating event of this year’s inaugural Five Rivers Chautauqua with storysharing and storylistening as we gather in right relationship to celebrate our unity.

Website: facebook.com/fiveriverschautauqua/

SunWatch Indian Village/Archaeological Park

SunWatch, originally named the Incinerator Site, was first excavated and reported on in the 1960s by amateur archaeologists John Allman and Charles Smith. When news came in the early 1970s that the City of Dayton planned to expand a nearby sewage treatment plant onto the property and impact the site, Allman and Smith contacted James Heilman, the Curator of Anthropology at the Dayton Museum of Natural History, in hopes of recovering as much valuable information from the site as possible. In 1971 the Dayton Museum of Natural History (now the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery) began “salvage” excavations at the site with just this goal in mind.

Website: SunWatch.org/